UC Must-Reads: How Will the History Books Remember 2021?

Politico convened 18 top historians to imagine how this year will be written about a century from now. Well, guess what? It ain’t pretty. From The Big Lie, to the ongoing attack on voting rights, to the pandemic, America in 2021 is more polarized and divided than ever. Click below for more.

Read more: UC Must-Reads: How Will the History Books Remember 2021?

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Temporary permits enacted for bars, restaurants | Manhattan Times

Step right in.

Governor Kathy Hochul has signed a pair of bills designed to remove red tape and help new bars, restaurants and other alcoholic beverage businesses to open more quickly.

On December 22, Hochul signed a bill that allows for temporary retail permits to be issued for bars and restaurants opening in New York City, putting these businesses on the same footing as businesses in the rest of the state.

The legislation will make it more efficient for new businesses to open, said the governor.

“Let’s raise a glass to the terrific bars, restaurants, breweries and other small businesses that are a vital part of New York’s economy,” Hochul said. “As we continue to fight the pandemic, we also need to make sure we protect our economy, and this legislation will cut red tape and bring more customers in the door as quickly as possible to help small businesses get back on their feet.”

State Senator Jessica Ramos, a sponsor of the legislation, called the new laws “a lifeline to bars and restaurants in NYC.”

Read more: Temporary permits enacted for bars, restaurants | Manhattan Times

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$20.5 million awarded for anti-gun violence programs | Bronx Free Press

Results yield rewards.

New York City has received a $20.5 million federal grant to support ongoing work by Cure Violence providers as part of the city’s Crisis Management System (CMS) network – chosen from a pool of 36 government applicants.

The grant is part of the U.S. Treasury’s Social Impact Partnerships to Pay for Results Act Program (SIPPRA), a federal reinvestment program created in 2018 that provides state and local governments an opportunity to be awarded for “pay-for-results” projects that can show direct and tested improvements in one of a number of social service categories.

“New York City is the second jurisdiction in this country to win this award, because of the extraordinary work being done here,” said Mayor Bill de Blasio at a media briefing on Tues., Dec. 28. “This is a movement that’s growing and evolving. Some of the best and most creative work is happening here in New York City. And that is a credit to all the members of the Crisis Management System, the Cure Violence Movement.”

Read more: $20.5 million awarded for anti-gun violence programs | Bronx Free Press

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Uptown On TV: Mr. Untouchable On Prime

Nicky Barnes was the face of heroin trafficking in NYC in the 1970s. That was until that very same face made the cover of The NY Times Magazine. That was the beginning of the end. Mr. Untouchable tells the story of the rise and fall of one of the most notorious hustlers to ever come out of Harlem. 

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The Uptown Tweet of the Week: Get Vaccinated

We invite you to subscribe to the weekly Uptown Love newsletter, like our Facebook page and follow us on Twitter & Instagram or e-mail us at UptownCollective@gmail.com.

The 1st Enslaved Uprising In The Americas Takes Place 500 Years Ago Today

Five hundred years ago today, the first revolt of enslaved people in the Americas took place in Quisqueya.

On December 26, 1521 the Santo Domingo Slave Revolt kicked off at a sugar plantation owned by Diego Columbus, son of Christopher Columbus. The uprising was ultimately unsuccessful but it marked the first time enslaved Africans would resist en masse against their colonial oppressors.

For more: https://www.ccny.cuny.edu/dsi

We invite you to subscribe to the weekly Uptown Love newsletter, like our Facebook page and follow us on Twitter & Instagram or e-mail us at UptownCollective@gmail.com.