Help Councilman Ydanis Rodriguez Spend A Million Dollars

BY Led Black (@Led_Black)

Ydanis Speaks - UC

That’s right, Councilman Ydanis Rodriguez has $1 Million in discretionary funds to spend on capital improvement projects within the district and he is going directly to the people to find out how to spend it.

The participatory budgeting process kicks off tonight at the Inwood Library (4790 Broadway) at 6 pm and continues on October 21st at the Fort Washington Library (535 West 179th Street) at 6 pm and on October 30th at the Washington Heights Library (1000 St. Nicholas) at 6 pm. Residents of the district can help with coming up with potential projects as well choosing delegates who will then develop those ideas into proposals. The proposals will then be voted on early next year.

So there you have it folks  – Democracy in action.

Related:

Ydanis Speaks – The 2013 State of Northern Manhattan Address: The Future of Northern Manhattan

Uptown 2011 Movers & Shakers: Ydanis Rodriguez – A Man of the People

Introducing Ydanis Speaks

Ydanis Speaks: The Importance of Diversity in Higher Education Leadership

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Uptown Video: Luminata

A site-specific dance piece presented by the West Harlem Arts Fund as part of Harlem’s Festival of Lights for the third installment of the Under the Viaduct Tour series.

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New Music: Tellie Floydd – The Vent

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Time Travel Tuesdays: Mura Dehn, Dancer, As Subject and Chronicler | NY Times

By JENNIFER DUNNING
Published: December 16, 1987

Dancers at the famed Savoy Ballroom in Harlem. (Photo: AP)

Dancers at the famed Savoy Ballroom in Harlem. (Photo: AP)

FOR many dancegoers, Mura Dehn is known, a little vaguely, as a woman who had something to do with film and black dancers. But the Film Forum is doing something about that, with a double feature consisting of ”In a Jazz Way,” a short film on Miss Dehn by Louise Ghertler and Pamela Katz, and a two-hour excerpt from ”The Spirit Moves: A History of Black Social Dance on Film,” a documentary by Miss Dehn. The program opens today for a two-week run at Film Forum 1.

”In a Jazz Way,” shot in 1985, offers a tantalizing look at Miss Dehn. It has the look of a documentary that originally had more ambitious things on its mind, but Miss Ghertler and Miss Katz do give us an undiluted dose of Miss Dehn, who died in February. We see her at her kitchen table, in her apartment in Washington Heights, reminiscing about her youth in Vienna and about her work recording and preserving the artistry of some of the great known and anonymous dancers of the Savoy Ballroom in Harlem.

Schooled in the dancing style of Isadora Duncan, Miss Dehn had been exposed to jazz in her native Russia, but she became a jazz fan when she met Josephine Baker in Paris in 1925. Judging by old film clips of her own work, Miss Dehn made fascinating use of jazz idioms to create her own unusual form of concert dance. She arrived in New York in 1930. ”I wanted to come home,” she says, ”to be within my own land of dance. I was waiting to come.”

Read more: Mura Dehn, Dancer, As Subject and Chronicler – NYTimes.com.

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Monday Mood Music: Oveous Ft. Tiffany Janell – Burj Eye View

Oveous

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Evidence of Native American activity uncovered in Isham Park | My Inwood

by Cole Thompson

Arrowheads - Isham Park - Inwood

Arrowheads found by William Isham. Source Archeological investigations on Manhattan island, New York city By Alanson Skinner.

An ongoing improvement project in a city park has uncovered signs of Native American settlement on the northern tip of Manhattan.

Workers digging a trench for the installation of water fountains in Isham Park have unearthed a curious concentration of shells.

Could the shells be part of a larger shell midden? Could other artifacts remain buried nearby?

The notion that important Native American artifacts lie below the carefully manicured lawn isn’t that much of a stretch.  In fact, Isham Park may be one of the few remaining sites on Manhattan where an archeological dig would still be possible.

The original owner of the park, William B. Isham, a wealthy leather merchant whose family later donated the land to the city for use as a park, was well aware of the rich Native history that lay beneath his feet.

Read more: Evidence of Native American activity uncovered in Isham Park | My Inwood

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