08/03/18: Cocote In Theaters…

It’s time to support Dominican film again. That’s right folks, you can catch the much buzzed about Dominican film Cocote this Friday August 3. Dominican filmmaker Nelson Carlo de los Santos Arias explores the lurking violence, corruption, and class conflicts in the Dominican Republic through the tale of a gardener whose tense return to his country home is compounded by the fact that he is expected to avenge his father’s murder. Remember folks, if we don’t support our art who will? The Dominican film industry is growing by leaps and bounds and we need to continue to support that trajectory. Click below and get your tickets.

Get TIX: 08/03/18: Cocote In Theaters…

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Uptown Video: Why Do Dominicans Own So Many New York Corner Stores?

The bodega is an NYC institution. It’s where you get anything from eggs and milk to hot sandwiches and plátanos. And for decades, the Dominican-American community has run so many of them, turning them from corner stores to something extra special. The good folks at AJ+ explain why?

Related:

Nothing Can Replace the Bodega | NY Times

Bodegas: Living the American Dream

New York City Bodegas And The Generations Who Love Them | NPR

Bodegas Declining in Manhattan as Rents Rise and Chains Grow | NY Times

The Chopped Cheese’s Sharp Rise to Fame | NY Times

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08/01/18: Community Forum on Proposed Inwood Rezoning

Inwood NYC Sunrise

Inwood Rezoning Community Forum
Wednesday, August 1, 2018 – 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
Washington Heights Academy (202 Sherman Avenue)

Representative Adriano Espaillat (NY-13) and Manhattan Borough President Gale A. Brewer will hold an Inwood Rezoning Community Forum on Wednesday, August 1st starting at 6:00 p.m. at the Washington Heights Academy located at 202 Sherman Avenue.

Earlier this year, Rep. Espaillat urged Mayor de Blasio to commit to creating 5,000 new units of affordable housing in Washington Heights and Inwood and reduce the rezoning catchment area to the Sherman Creek, east of the 10th Avenue neighborhood as a condition to supporting a rezoning of Inwood.

During the forum, officials will discuss and hear from residents on how the rezoning proposal immediately impacts them, area families, as well as the community. The event is open to all members of the public.

Please RSVP to RSVP.Espaillat@mail.house.gov.

Related:

Revisiting the Inwood rezoning | Manhattan Times

Cross Broadway and Think Big

600 People Pack Board’s Inwood Rezoning Hearing | City Limits

Photo Essay: Inwood Hard at Work, Set to Change | City Limits

We invite you to subscribe to the weekly Uptown Love newsletter, like our Facebook page and follow us on Twitter & Instagram or e-mail us at UptownCollective@gmail.com.

City unveils anti-displacement pilot program | Manhattan Times

Story and photos by Gregg McQueen

The announcement was made on an Academy Street rooftop.

It’s just days away.

The City Council’s decision on the Inwood rezoning is expected to come in early August.
And on Tuesday, city officials took to an Inwood rooftop to announce a pilot program designed to bolster anti-displacement efforts there, as well as other areas targeted for rezoning.

The Partners in Preservation program, run by the Department of Housing Preservation and Development (HPD), will help community-based organizations fight displacement in their communities by providing funding for tenant organizing and education, legal assistance, and other programs.

The 18-month pilot is slated to begin in early 2019 in Inwood/Washington Heights, East Harlem and the Jerome Avenue area of the Bronx, as HPD Commissioner María Torres-Springer said the program is expected to help nearly 6,000 residents in about 200 buildings in those communities.

“It will start by using data so we can really target rent-regulated buildings where the prospect of harassment is most likely, then we will establish action plans very specific to that neighborhood,” she explained.

Torres-Springer said HPD would issue a Request for Proposals (RFP) in the fall to solicit community-based organizations to partner with.

Read more: City unveils anti-displacement pilot program | Manhattan Times

Related:

Cross Broadway and Think Big

Revisiting the Inwood rezoning | Manhattan Times

Opposition to rezoning resounds | Manhattan Times

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The Lost Ones | Manhattan Times

Story by Gregg McQueen and Desiree Johnson

Children separated from their families arrive uptown.

The children have come north.

Officials are estimating that over 700 children – the youngest being 9 months old – have been sent to foster care in New York State after being separated from their parents at the U.S. border.

Of these, 350 have been sent to Cayuga Center, a foster care provider in East Harlem, and 239 remain under their care.

On Wed., Jun. 20th, Mayor Bill de Blasio visited Cayuga Center, located on Park Avenue, along with Health Commissioner Dr. Mary Bassett, Administration for Children’s Services Commissioner David Hansell, and Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs (MOIA) Commissioner Bitta Mostofi.

“These children are across a whole range of ages, the youngest to come here they told us was nine months old. So, we’re talking about children in some cases who literally can’t even communicate, have no idea what’s happening to them, no ability to be in touch with their families,” de Blasio said outside the center.

The children have been sent to Cayuga since April, when the Trump administration enacted its “zero tolerance” policy on separating children from parents at the U.S./Mexico border. De Blasio said that 239 children hailed largely from Guatemala. They are with foster parents at night and visit the center by day for services, said de Blasio, who remarked that he was “shocked to find” that migrant children were being shipped to New York City.

The same day as the Mayor’s visit, President Donald Trump reversed course and signed an executive order to halt family separations at the border following a public outcry. Trump stated that the order would keep families together, though still detained, and does not change the “zero tolerance” policy itself.

Read more: The Lost Ones | Manhattan Times

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Lady Victorious | Bronx Free Press

Story by Debralee Santos and Gregg McQueen
Photos by Corey Torpie

“This evening changed America.”

She spoke, fittingly, from the bar, standing atop a cluster of tables and framed from behind by flickering television screens and fully stocked liquor shelves.

Just a year ago, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, a Parkchester resident, Democratic Socialist and organizer, was tending bar to make ends meet.

Now, on Tues., Jun. 26th, the first-time candidate had just been declared the winner of the Democratic primary for the 14th Congressional district – accomplishing what is near-impossible in New York politics: toppling an incumbent.

That this officeholder was the so-called “King of Queens,” Joseph Crowley, who’d first been elected to Congress in 1998 and had faced no primary challenge in 14 years, made the 28-year-old Boricua’s triumph national news.

And she was celebrating with supporters at a bar in the Bronx.

Read more: Lady Victorious | Bronx Free Press

Continue Reading

‘Stop and Frisk’ is Over, But Low-Level NYPD Encounters Now Raise Concerns | City Limits

By Katarina Zimmer and Elise Hansen

Dister says he has frequently been approached by police officers in situations where he did not feel free to leave. But those encounters likely did not show up in the official tally of ‘stops.’ (Photo: Adi Talwar)

One fall evening about two years ago, a man named Dister was walking with a friend in Washington Heights, near 173rd Street, when he was abruptly approached by a pair of police officers.

“Hey, where you guys going? Are you coming from a train station?” Dister recalls them asking loudly.

Dister, who does not want his last name published, saw no apparent reason for the officers to approach him and his friend in the first place.

He perceived the officers’ questions as unnecessary and confrontational, but said he didn’t feel comfortable ignoring them or just walking away. These kinds of experiences have been a regular occurrence for him in his Washington Heights neighborhood, he said.

For Dister, the era of “stop, question and frisk” isn’t over. Experts warn that he isn’t alone in his experience, although it is hard to say how common it is because similar episodes affecting numerous New Yorkers may never show up in the NYPD’s statistics.

Read more: ‘Stop and Frisk’ is Over, But Low-Level NYPD Encounters Now Raise Concerns | City Limits

Related:

Vibrant Opposition at BP’s Inwood Rezoning Hearing | City Limits

Photo Essay: Inwood Hard at Work, Set to Change | City Limits

We invite you to subscribe to the weekly Uptown Love newsletter, like our Facebook page and follow us on Twitter & Instagram or e-mail us at UptownCollective@gmail.com.